15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from ~Mr. Nobody~ with 24,456 notes

spinsterprivilege:

noirnites:

Macabre statues to keep me company outside my new office.

Congratulations on the job. I didn’t know Hell was even hiring.

spinsterprivilege:

noirnites:

Macabre statues to keep me company outside my new office.

Congratulations on the job. I didn’t know Hell was even hiring.

Source: noirnites

14th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from t r a n s a t l a n t i c i s m with 9,139 notes

killapede:

drawing lots of places this summer

Source: killapede

14th September 2014

Photo reblogged from isamizdat with 768 notes

peonyandbee:

transparentoctopus: Harold Sohlberg, winter night in the mountains 1901 (via Stephen Ellcock)

peonyandbee:

transparentoctopus: Harold Sohlberg, winter night in the mountains 1901 (via Stephen Ellcock)

Source: transparentoctopus

14th September 2014

Photo reblogged from WALISZEWSKA with 10,011 notes

14th September 2014

Photo reblogged from The Near-Sighted Monkey with 125 notes

dig-image:

Aleksandra Waliszewska

dig-image:

Aleksandra Waliszewska

Source: dig-image

14th September 2014

Photo reblogged from isamizdat with 501 notes


God of the Forest (2014)
oil on linen, 39x28 in.
by Aron Wiesenfeld

God of the Forest (2014)

oil on linen, 39x28 in.

by Aron Wiesenfeld

Source: mirrormaskcamera

14th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from BITCH BANGS with 4,266 notes

sci-universe:

These are the depictions of the most intense meteor storm in recorded history – the Leonid meteor storm of 1833. The Leonid meteor shower is annually active in the month of November, and it occurs when the Earth passes through the debris left by the comet Tempel-Tuttle. While the typical rates are about 10 to 15 meteors per hour, the storm of 1833 is speculated to have been over 100,000 meteors per hour, frightening people half to death.
Here’s how Agnes Clerke, an astronomer witnessing the event, described it:  “On the night of November 12-13, 1833, a tempest of falling stars broke over the Earth… The sky was scored in every direction with shining tracks and illuminated with majestic fireballs. At Boston, the frequency of meteors was estimated to be about half that of flakes of snow in an average snowstorm.” (x)

Source: sci-universe

14th September 2014

Photo reblogged from MORRISBOX with 1 note

morrisbox:

By me and Fionnuala

morrisbox:

By me and Fionnuala

11th September 2014

Photo reblogged from (the atari generation) with 14 notes

rickkanelives:

The ReturnAron Wiesenfeld Oil on Linen

rickkanelives:

The Return
Aron Wiesenfeld
Oil on Linen

9th September 2014

Photo reblogged from per temeritas with 321 notes


Fig. 82. A lunar mountain. Mount Copernicus. 1881.

Fig. 82. A lunar mountain. Mount Copernicus. 1881.

Source: archive.org